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About the BRAVE Program

The BRAVE Program is a free online program for the prevention and treatment of anxiety in Australian children and young people aged 8-17, and their parents. The program was developed by a team of researchers from the University of Queensland, Griffith University and the University of Southern Queensland, and has been specially designed to teach young people the skills they need to reduce anxiety and to cope with stressful situations.


Who is the BRAVE Program for?

The BRAVE Program is designed for youth aged 8-17 years, and their parents.

There is a program for 8-12 year olds, and one for 13-17 year olds.


Is there a cost to use the BRAVE Program?

No.


How to access the BRAVE Program's services

For the BRAVE Child Program (ages 8-12):

  • Both parent and child consent is required
  • Users must include their age, name, email address, gender, chosen password, suburb location, and whether or not (parent and children) were born in Australia.

For the BRAVE Teen Program (ages 12 - 17):

  • Parental consent is required for young people up to 15 years
  • Users must include their age, name, email address, gender, chosen password, suburb location, and whether or not (parent and young person) were born in Australia.

The BRAVE Program Research and Evaluation

The BRAVE Program has undergone extensive research for over a decade, including a number of Randomised Control Trials and evaluations. There is currently further research being conducted on the efficacy of trans-diagnostic versus specific treatment for children aged 8-17 years with Social Anxiety Disorder.

Research citations:

  • Anderson, R. E., Spence, S. H., Donovan, C. L., March, S., Prosser, S. & Kenardy, J. (2012). Working alliance in online cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders in youth: comparison with clinic delivery and its role in predicting outcome. Journal of medical Internet research, 14(3), e88.
  • Donovan, C. L., Spence, S. H. & March, S. (2013). Using new technologies to deliver cognitive behaviour therapy with children and adolescents. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Children and Families, 351.
  • Holmes, J., March, S. & Spence, S. (2009). Use of the Internet in the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders with Children and Adolescents. Counselling, Psychotherapy, and Health, 5(1), 187-231.
  • March, S., Spence, S. H. & Donovan, C. L. (2009). The efficacy of an internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention for child anxiety disorders. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 34(5), 474-487.
  • Spence, S. H., Donovan, C. L., March, S., Gamble, A., Anderson, R., Prosser, S., . . . Kenardy, J. (2008). Online CBT in the treatment of child and adolescent anxiety disorders: Issues in the development of BRAVE–ONLINE and two case illustrations. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 36(04), 411-430.
  • Spence, S. H., Donovan, C. L., March, S., Gamble, A., Anderson, R., Prosser, S., . . . Kenardy, J. (2008). Online CBT in the treatment of child and adolescent anxiety disorders: Issues in the development of BRAVE–ONLINE and two case illustrations. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 36(Special Issue 04), 411-430. doi: doi:10.1017/S135246580800444X
  • Spence, S. H., Donovan, C. L., March, S., Gamble, A., Anderson, R. E., Prosser, S. & Kenardy, J. (2011). A randomized controlled trial of online versus clinic-based CBT for adolescent anxiety. Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 79(5), 629.
  • Spence, S. H., Holmes, J. M., March, S. & Lipp, O. V. (2006). The feasibility and outcome of clinic plus Internet delivery of cognitive-behavior therapy for childhood anxiety. doi: 10.1037/0022-006X.74.3.614